The Church of the Transfiguration

​Braddock Heights, MD

Rooted in Christ

   Bound in Love

      Called to Ministry

Feast of Saint James  October 23

Feast of Saint Michael and All Angels   September 29

The Transfiguration of Jesus is an event reported in the New Testament when Jesus is transfigured and becomes radiant in glory upon a mountain.  The Synoptic Gospels (Matthew 17:1–8, Mark 9:2–8, Luke 9:28–36) describe it, and the Second Epistle of Peter also refers to it (2 Peter 1:16–18).  It has also been hypothesized that the first chapter of the Gospel of John alludes to it (John 1:14).
In these accounts, Jesus and three of his apostles, Peter, James, John, go to a mountain (the Mount of Transfiguration) to pray.  On the mountain, Jesus begins to shine with bright rays of light.  Then the prophets Moses and Elijah appear next to him and he speaks with them.  Jesus is then called "Son" by a voice in the sky, assumed to be God the Father, as in the Baptism of Jesus.
Many Christian traditions, including the Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Anglican churches, commemorate the event in the Feast of the Transfiguration, a major festival.

In Anglican and Episcopal tradition, there are three or four archangels in its calendar for 29 September feast for St. Michael and All Angels: namely Michael, Gabriel and Raphael, and Uriel.  The Bible itself identifies only Michael as an archangel (Jude:9).

In Christian angelology, the Archangel Michael is the greatest of all the Archangels and is honored for defeating Satan in the war in heaven.  He is one of the principal angelic warriors, seen as a protector against the dark of night, and the administrator of cosmic intelligence.

The name Michaelmas comes from a shortening of "Michael's Mass," in the same style as Christmas (Christ's Mass).  Because it falls near the equinox, it is associated in the northern hemisphere with the beginning of autumn and the shortening of days.  

St. Bartholomew, a doctor in the Jewish law, was a dear friend of St. Philip the Apostle.  Because Bartholomew was a man "in whom there was no guile," his mind was open to the truth. He went willingly with Philip to see Christ, and recognized the Savior immediately as the Son of God.  After having received the gifts of the Holy Spirit on the first Pentecost, Bartholomew evangelized Asia Minor, northwestern India, and Greater Armenia.  In the latter country, while preaching to idolaters, he was arrested and condemned to death where he was flayed.

Feast of Saint Mary the Virgin   August 15

In the Christian liturgical calendar, there are several different Feasts of the Cross, all of which commemorate the cross used in the crucifixion of Jesus. While Good Friday is dedicated to the Passion of Christ and the Crucifixion, these days celebrate the cross itself, as the instrument of salvation.

This feast is known as "The Exaltation of the Holy Cross" in the eastern church and in missals and sacramentaries of the western church, and it is known as "The Triumph of the Cross" in the Roman Catholic Church. It was one of the 12 great feasts in the Byzantine liturgy. The 1979 BCP is the first American Prayer Book to include Holy Cross Day.

James, son of Zebedee (died 44 AD) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus, and traditionally considered the first apostle to be martyred.  He was a son of Zebedee and Salome, and brother of John the Apostle.  He is also called James the Greater or James the Great to distinguish him from James, son of Alphaeus and James the brother of Jesus (James the Just). James the son of Zebedee is the patron saint of Spaniards, and as such is often identified as Santiago.

Simon the Zealot (Acts 1:13), Simon, who was called the Zealot (Luke 6:15), Simon Kananaios (Matthew 10:4) or Simon Cananeus (Mark 3:18) was one of the most obscure among the apostles of Jesus.  Simon is often associated with St. Jude as an evangelizing team; in Western Christianity, they share their feast day on 28 October. The most widespread tradition is that after evangelizing in Egypt, Simon joined Jude in Persia and Armenia or Beirut, Lebanon, where both were martyred in 65 AD.


Jude, also known as Judas Thaddaeus, was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus.  He is generally identified with Thaddeus, and is also variously called Jude of James, Jude Thaddaeus, Judas Thaddaeus or Lebbaeus.  He is sometimes identified with Jude, the brother of Jesus, but is clearly distinguished from Judas Iscariot, the apostle who betrayed Jesus prior to his crucifixion.

According to tradition, Saint Jude suffered martyrdom about 65 AD in Beirut, in the Roman province of Syria, together with the apostle Simon the Zealot, with whom he is usually connected. The axe that he is often shown holding in pictures symbolizes the way in which he was killed.  Their acts and martyrdom were recorded in an Acts of Simon and Jude that was among the collection of passions and legends traditionally associated with the legendary Abdias, bishop of Babylon, and said to have been translated into Latin by his disciple Tropaeus Africanus, according to the Golden Legend account of the saints.


After his martyrdom, pilgrims came to his grave to pray and many of them experienced the powerful intercessions of St. Jude. Thus the title, 'The Saint for the Hopeless and the Despaired'. St. Bridget of Sweden and St. Bernard had visions from God asking each to accept St. Jude as 'The Patron Saint of the Impossible'.

The Order of Preachers (known better as the Dominicans) began working in present-day Armenia soon after their founding in 1216. At that time, there was already a substantial devotion to Saint Jude by both Catholic and Orthodox Christians in the area. This lasted until persecution drove Christians from the area in the 18th century. Devotion to Saint Jude began again in earnest in the 19th century, starting in Italy and Spain, spreading to South America, and finally to the United States (starting in the area around Chicago) owing to the influence of the Claretians and the Dominicans in the 1920s.

August 15 is the feast of the Virgin Mary.  Generally, Protestants call her Mary, the mother of Jesus, while Roman Catholics refer to her as the Blessed Virgin, and Greek Orthodox Christians call Mary the God bearer.  In Episcopal circles, all these titles are used along with others: Mary of Nazareth; Mary, the Mother of God; the Virgin Mary and Mary, Mother of Our Lord Jesus Christ are but a few examples.  Mary's many titles both reflect her significance to Christians and our various perceptions about the impact her life and ministry have on our faith.

Feast of Saint Bartholomew the Apostle  August 24

Feast Days

Feast of Saint Matthew   September 21

Feast of the Transfiguration August 6

Matthew is recognized as a saint in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican churches.  His feast day is celebrated on 21 September in the West.  Matthew was a 1st-century Galilean (presumably born in Galilee, which was not part of Judea), the son of Alpheus.  As a tax collector he would have been literate in Aramaic and Greek.  His fellow Jews would have despised him for what was seen as collaborating with the Roman occupation force.  After his call, Matthew invited Jesus home for a feast.  On seeing this, the Scribes and the Pharisees criticized Jesus for eating with tax collectors and sinners.  This prompted Jesus to answer, "I came not to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance." (Mark 2:17, Luke 5:32)

The New Testament records that as a disciple, he followed Jesus, and was one of the witnesses of the Resurrection and the Ascension of Jesus.  Afterwards, the disciples withdrew to an upper room (Acts 1:10–14) in Jerusalem.  The disciples remained in and about Jerusalem and proclaimed that Jesus was the promised Messiah.

Holy Cross Day - Feast of the Cross  September 14

Feast of St. Simon & St. Jude  October 28